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Fall Semester 2017
Apr 20, 2019
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CSE 10101 - Elements of Computing I
Introduction to programming for students without prior programming experience. Programming structures suitable for basic computation. Elements of computer organization and networking. Development of programming skills including data manipulation, multimedia programming, and networking. Standards for exchange and presentation of data. Comprehensive programming experience using Python.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CDCR Comptng & Digtl Tech Core, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 10102 - Elements of Computing II
CSE 10102/CDT 30020 is the second course in the core programming sequence in the Computing & Digital Technologies Minor. Building on your prior experience with the Python programming language, you will explore advanced programming paradigms such as functional and object-oriented programming, familiarize yourself with elements of software engineering such as the command line interface, version control, and development environments, and utilize web and cloud-based services. To demonstrate your mastery of these skills and concepts, you will work on an interdisciplinary team project throughout the semester that applies your knowledge to a problem related to one of the CDT tracks.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20110 - Discrete Mathematics
Introduction to mathematical techniques fundamental to computer engineering and computer science. Topics: mathematical logic, induction, set theory, relations, functions, recursion, recurrence relations, introduction to asymptotic analysis, algebraic structures, graphs, and machine computation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20133 - Introduction to Computing for EE Majors
This course introduces Electrical Engineering majors to computational thinking, and develops their ability to solve engineering problems in software. Students will learn structured programming, algorithm analysis and development, C syntax and semantics, logical and syntactical debugging, and software engineering fundamentals. Students will engage in practical, hands-on programming exercises both inside and outside of class
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20189 - Basic Unix for Engineers
This course will cover basic Unix/Linux, as well as make files, shell scripting, etc.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20211 - Fundamentals of Computing I
This is the first part of a two-course introduction-to-computing sequence, intended primarily for computer science and computer engineering majors. It introduces fundamental concepts and principles of computer science, from formulating a problem and analyzing it conceptually, to designing, implementing, and testing a program on a computer. Using data and procedural abstractions as basic design principles for programs, students learn to define basic data structures, such as lists and trees, and to apply various algorithms for operating on them. The course also introduces object-oriented and parallel programming methods.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20212 - Fundamentals of Computing II
This is the second part of a two-course introduction-to-computing sequence, intended primarily for computer science and computer engineering majors. This course introduces concepts and techniques for developing large software systems. The object-oriented model of design and programming is presented using a modern programming language such as Java or C++. Topics covered include modularity, specification, data abstraction, classes and objects, genericness, inheritance, subtyping, design patterns, testing, concurrency, object persistency, and databases.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20221 - Logic Design and Sequential Circuits
Boolean algebra and switching circuits, Karnaugh maps, design of combinational and of sequential logic networks, and sequential machines.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20232 - C/C++ Programming
This course introduces students to computational thinking, and develops their ability to solve engineering problems in software. Students will learn structured programming, algorithm analysis and development, C syntax and semantics, logical and syntactical debugging, and software engineering fundamentals. Students will engage in practical, hands-on programming exercises both inside and outside of class.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CETE - CE Technical Electives, MET - ME General Techncl Elctv, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20289 - Systems Programming
Systems Programming is a core Computer Science course that explores the fundamentals of computing systems. This course introduces students to the Unix programming environment where they will explore numerical representation, memory management, system calls, data structures, networking, and concurrency. Examining these topics will enable students to become familiar and comfortable with the lower level aspects of computing, while providing the foundation for further study in subsequent systems courses such as computer architecture and operating systems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20311 - Fundamentals of Computing
This is the first part of a two-course computer programming sequence, intended primarily for computer science and computer engineering majors. It introduces fundamental concepts and principles of computer science, from formulating a problem and analyzing it conceptually, to designing, implementing, and testing a program on a computer. Using data and procedural abstractions as basic design principles for programs, students learn to define basic data structures, such as lists and trees, and to apply various algorithms for operating on them. The course also introduces object-oriented methods.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20312 - Data Structures
This is the second part of a two-course introduction-to-computing sequence intended for Computer Science and Computer Engineering majors. This course deepens and broadens student exposure to imperative and object-oriented programming and data structures. Topics covered include modularity, specification, data abstraction, classes and objects, genericity, inheritance. This course will focus these topics on design and use of elementary data structures such as lists, stacks, queues, and trees, as well as advanced techniques such as divide-and-conquer, sorting, searching and graph algorithms. More advanced data structures such as priority queues and search trees will also be covered.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 20600 - CSE Service Projects
Engineering projects in community service.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect, ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 21211 - Fundamentals of Computing I Lab
Lab for Fundamentals of Computing I.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
2.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 21212 - Fundamentals of Computing II Lab
Lab Fundamentals of Computing II.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
2.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 21221 - Logic Design Laboratory
Lab for Logic Design.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 21311 - Fundamentals of Computing Lab
Lab for Fundamentals of Computing.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 21312 - Data Structures Lab
Lab for CSE 20312
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 24222 - C/C++ Programming
Taught at a host institution. This course introduces students to computational thinking, and develops their ability to solve engineering problems in software. Students will learn structured programming, algorithm analysis and development, C syntax and semantics, logical and syntactical debugging, and software engineering fundamentals. Students will engage in practical, hands-on programming exercises both inside and outside of class.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOOX - Oxford University (OX)

CSE 24232 - C/C++ Programming
This unit covers the fundamental aspects of the standard C programming language, focusing strongly on the language structures and techniques needed to write well-structured programs in the imperative paradigm. Core computer programming topics such as the use of variables, data types, expressions, control structures, scoping rules, the use of functions and parameters, pointers and dynamic memory allocation and management, debugging, performance measurement, and the development of large C projects in multiple files are covered in this context. The use of the standard C library and the relationship between the C programming language and popular operating systems are also examined. A strong focus is placed on the practical application of these concepts and techniques to produce robust programs.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 24233 - Intro to Functional Programming
Ignore the second input. That was an accident. On completion of this module, students should have gained an overall introduction to the theory and applications of cryptography - the science of secrecy. They will: - gain an understanding of the fundamental concepts concerning computer and network security; - have an understanding of the mathematics and the algorithms behind several well known cryptosystems; - conceptually identify vulnerabilities, including recent attacks, involving the Internet of Things; - conceptually describe countermeasures for Internet of Things devices; - develop critical thinking skills. his course introduces students to a different style of programming ("functional programming") using a simple, elegant and fun language called Scheme. The course will cover a range of functional programming topics including (but not limited to) function definition, representations using lists, recursion, double recursion, recursive problem solving, and lambda.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 24289 - Systems Programming
Understanding the relationship between a programming language and the contemporary operating systems on which it executes is central to developing many skills in Computer Science. This unit introduces the standard C programming language, on which many other programming languages and systems are based, through a study of core operating system services including input and output, memory management and file systems. The C language is introduced through discussions on basic topics like data types, variables, expressions, control structures, scoping rules, functions and parameter passing. More advanced topics like C's run-time environment, system calls, dynamic memory allocation, pointers and recursion are presented in the context of operating system services related to process execution, memory management and file systems. The importance of process scheduling, memory management and interprocess communication in modern operating systems is discussed in the context of operating system support for multiprogramming. Laboratory and tutorial work place a strong focus on the practical application of fundamental programming concepts, with examples designed to compare and contrast many key features of contemporary operating systems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 30125 - Computational Methods
Fundamentals of numerical methods and development of programming techniques to solve problems in civil and environmental engineering. This course requires significant computer use via a scientific program language such as Matlab and/or FORTRAN. Standard topics in numerical linear algebra, interpolation, discrete differentiation, discrete integration, and approximate solutions to ordinary differential equations are treated in a context-based approach. Applications are drawn from hydrology, environmental modeling, geotechnical engineering, modeling of material behavior, and structural analysis. Fall.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30151 - Theory of Computing
Introduction to formal languages and automata, computability theory, and complexity theory with the goal of developing understanding of the power and limits of different computational models. Topics covered include: regular languages and finite automata; context-free grammars and pushdown automata; Turing machines; undecidable languages; the classes P and NP; NP completeness.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30189 - Basic Unix for Engineers
This course will cover basic Unix/Linux, as well as make files, shell scripting, etc.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30246 - Database Concepts
Effective techniques in managing, retrieving and updating information from a database system. Focusing primarily on relational databases, the course presents the entity-relationship model, query processing, and normalization. Topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security will also be discussed. A final project will consist of the design and the implementation of a database system with a Web interface.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30264 - Computer Networks
This course introduces students to fundamental topics on the principles, design, implementation, and performance of computer networks. Topics include: Internet architecture, protocols, socket programming, congestion control, switching and routing, local area networks, mobile and ad-hoc networks, network security, the end-to-end arguments and resource allocation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30321 - Computer Architecture
Introduction to basic architectural concepts that are present in current scalar machines, together with an introduction to assembly language programming, computer arithmetic, and performance evaluation. Commercial computer-aided-design software is used to deepen the student's understanding of the top-down processor design methodology. MIPS-based assembly language will be used.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30331 - Data Structures
Fundamental techniques in the design and analysis of non-numerical algorithms and their data structures. Elementary data structures such as lists, stacks, queues; more advanced ones such as priority queues and search trees. Design techniques such as divide-and-conquer. Sorting and searching and graph algorithms.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30332 - Programming Paradigms
Programming language overview: imperative and functional languages; logic programming. Scripting languages and tools. Development environments. Multilanguage interfacing. Case studies. Comprehensive programming practice using several languages.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30341 - Operating System Principles
Introduction to all aspects of modern operating systems. Topics include process structure and synchronization, interprocess communication, memory management, file systems, security, I/O, and distributed files systems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30600 - CSE Service Projects
Engineering projects in community service.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 30872 - Programming Challenges
This course encourages the development of practical programming and problem solving skills through extensive practice and guided learning. The bulk of the class revolves around solving "brain-teaser" and puzzle-type problems that often appear in programming contests, online challenges, and job interviews. Topics covered in this course include: performing I/O, processing strings, using data structures, performing searching and sorting, utilizing recursion, manipulating graphs, and applying advanced algorithmic techniques such as dynamic programming. Additionally, basic software engineering practices such as debugging, testing, and source code management will be utilized throughout the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 31321 - Computer Architecture Lab
Lab for Computer Architecture I.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 34151 - Theory of Computing
Introduction to formal languages and automata, computability theory, and complexity theory with the goal of developing understanding of the power and limits of different computational models. Topics covered include: regular languages and finite automata; context-free grammars and pushdown automata; Turing machines; undecidable languages; the classes P and NP; NP completeness.
3.000 OR 3.750 Credit hours
3.000 OR 3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
OLF-Fully Online (100 percent), ZOAS-St. Andrews, Scotland(AS), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOSS - Silicon Valley Semester

CSE 34246 - Databases and Information Systems
Taught at a host institution. COMP 20010 at UCD; This module is suitable for students interested in the design and analysis of efficient algorithms and data structures. In this module students learn how to analyse, design and implement a finite set of well-defined instructions for accomplishing some task (an algorithm) along with introductory ways of storing data in a computer so that it can be used efficiently (a data structure). A well-designed data structure or algorithm allows a variety of critical operations to be performed using as little resource, both execution time and memory space, as possible. Students will use an object-oriented paradigm as the framework of choice for building robust and reusable algorithms and data structures in this module. The OOP language for this module is Java. The first 6 weeks of the term will focus on introduction to Java. On completion of this module students should be able to: - Understand how to determine the amount of resources (such as time and storage) necessary to execute a particular algorithm (algorithm analysis)- Understand the object-oriented JAVA programming constructs needed to encode an algorithm- Understand the structure, nature and use of fundamental data structures including, Arrays, Linked Lists, Stacks, Queues, Lists, Trees - Understand the object-oriented programming constructs needed to encode a data structure and its access algorithms - Design programs using these constructs to solve large problems.- Successfully write, compile, debug and run programs using these constructs.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours

Levels: St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOBM - Bremen Germany (BM), ZOES - Edinburgh, Scotland(ES), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOSI- National U. of Singapore

CSE 34264 - Computer Networks and Internet Systems
Taught at a host institution. COMP 30040 Computer Networks at UCD. This module introduces the OSI stack to students, and goes through the various layers in detail. The topics covered include: Network Types, functions, topologies, transmissions, switching, routing, management, reference models, architectures, protocols and standards; network user applications; flow and congestion control strategies; design and implementation considerations; use in Internet systems. There will be a few hot topics included each year Taught as CS 3102 Data Communications and Networks at St. Andrews University.This module introduces the basics of data communications and computer networks, and examines network protocols and architectures.
3.000 TO 3.750 Credit hours
3.000 TO 3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAS-St. Andrews, Scotland(AS), ZOHK - Hong Kong, China (HK), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOSK - Seoul, Korea (SK)

CSE 34321 - Computer Architecture I
An introduction to several architectural concepts that are present in current scalar machines together with an introduction to assembly language programming. Topics include accessing simple I/O devices, computer arithmetic, floating point, interrupts, introduction to microcomputing and performance evaluation. Commercial computer-aided-design software is used to deepen the student's understanding of bus protocols and input/output. Assembly language programs use 80x86 platforms.
3.000 TO 4.000 Credit hours
3.000 TO 4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
OLF-Fully Online (100 percent), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOLA - London, Eng-Fall/Spring, ZOSI- National U. of Singapore

CSE 34322 - Computer Architecture I Lab
This course is the lab component of CSE 34321 which is an introduction to several architectural concepts that are present in current scalar machines together with an introduction to assembly language programming. Topics include accessing simple I/O devices, computer arithmetic, floating point, interrupts, introduction to microcomputing and performance evaluation. Commercial computer-aided-design software is used to deepen the student's understanding of bus protocols and input/output. Assembly language programs use 80x86 platforms.
1.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
1.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOLA - London, Eng-Fall/Spring

CSE 34331 - Data Structures
This course covers fundamental techniques in the design and analysis of non-numerical algorithms and their data structures. Elementary data structures such as lists, stacks, queues and more advanced ones such as priority queues and search trees. Design techniques such as divide-and-conquer. Sorting and searching graph algorithms.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOCU - HKU Hong, Kong(CU), ZOHK - Hong Kong, China (HK), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOLA - London, Eng-Fall/Spring, ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA), ZOSI- National U. of Singapore, ZOSK - Seoul, Korea (SK)

CSE 34332 - Programming Paradigms - SV Campus
Programming language overview: imperative and functional languages; logic programming. Scripting languages and tools. Development environments. Multilanguage interfacing. Case studies. Comprehensive programming practice using several languages.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOSS - Silicon Valley Semester

CSE 34341 - Operating Systems
Introduction to Oss, OS Structure, Hardware features and Oss. Processes: Independent and Co-operative processes, Synchonisation Mechanisms, Deadlocks and Starvation. Memory Management: Binding and Relocation, Memory Organisations (fixed and variable partitions), Paging Technique, Segmentation Technique, Virtual Memory. File Management: File System structures, Files, Directories, File System Implementation. Introduction to Security and Protection: Basic Issues, Security Problem, Authentication, Encryption, Protection Problem, Trusted Systems. Case Studies: Unix, WinNT.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours

Levels: St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
OLF-Fully Online (100 percent), ZOCU - HKU Hong, Kong(CU), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA), ZOSS - Silicon Valley Semester

CSE 34468 - Introduction to the Internet of Things
This course will introduce students to the basic building blocks of the Internet of Things starting with the underlying core hardware components (microcontrollers, input / output) at a lower level and basic fundamentals of interacting with said components (well-structured C[1]). With that basic knowledge, the course will work the through basics of I/O (digital input / output, interfacing with mechanical switches, driving digital output) to timing (real-time interrupts, measuring time, time-based output (ex. PWM)) to analog interactions (A/D, D/A) to communications (serial (SPI), parallel, basic IP networking, wireless).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIS - Dublin, Ireland -Summer

CSE 34777 - Creative Programming with Processing
This course introduces Processing, a programming language that uses computational and generative art as a context. It is designed for the construction of 2D and 3D visual forms and animation. It comes with its own IDE (Integrated Development Environment), which is light-weight but well-suited for the kind of rapid prototyping needed for dynamic visual work. Processing is a great way to introduce or strengthen programming by catalyzing excitement, creativity, and innovation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect, ZOAC-Alcoy, Spain(AC)

CSE 34794 - Silicon Valley Internship
Internship for Silicon Valley students
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOSS - Silicon Valley Semester

CSE 34999 - CSE Elective
Taught at a host institution. COMP 30070 Object-Oriented Programming at UCD. This module is concerned with Object-Oriented Programming using the Ruby language. It reviews object-oriented concepts such as classes, objects, message passing, inheritance and polymorphism in the context of Ruby. There is a strong emphasis on practical programming skills and the development of correct and maintainable software.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 40113 - Design/Analysis of Algorithms
Techniques for designing efficient computer algorithms and for analyzing computational costs of algorithms. Common design strategies such as dynamic programming, divide-and-conquer, and Greedy methods. Problem-solving approaches such as sorting, searching, and selection; lower bounds; data structures; algorithms for graph problems; geometric problems; and other selected problems. Computationally intractable problems (NP-completeness).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40151 - Automated Identity Technology Using Iris Texture
Can the texture pattern of the iris be used to create a reliable, unique identifier for each person on planet Earth? This course explores the technology of iris biometrics in depth: the underlying conceptual theory, image acquisition, image segmentation, texture analysis, matching of texture representations, identity management systems, and a selection of current research issues. The course includes readings from the literature, short writing assignments, and practical experience with current commercial iris biometric technology.
1.500 Credit hours
1.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40166 - Computer Graphics
Introduction to interactive computer graphics. Key topics include graphics pipeline, WebGL + GLSL programming, geometric objects and transformation, modeling and viewing, interaction and animation, lighting and shading, and texture mapping. Students are expected to learn fundamental knowledge of computer graphics, essential hands-on experience in WebGL programming, state-of-the-art shader-based, GPU-accelerated graphics, and popular library for cross-browser 3D graphics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40171 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Artificial Intelligence is a fascinating topic that integrates the basic scientific goal of understanding how minds work with the engineering goal of creating intelligent machines to solve real-world problems. It encompasses a number of fields including computer science, engineering, cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy. In this course, you will obtain a broad overview of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), including its historical and philosophical foundations, classical and contemporary approaches, cognitive systems, and recent trends and applications. Some (out of the many) things you will learn includes how to design computers to play chess intelligently, to understand human language, to recognize handwriting, to detect plagiarism, to solve complex puzzles, to make difficult decisions with imperfect information, to plan for the future, to store and retrieve memories like humans, and to learn from experience.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 40175 - Ethical and Professional Issues
This course seeks to develop a solid foundation for reasoning about ethical, professional, and social issues that arise in the context of computer science and engineering. Emphasis is placed on identifying appropriate legal, professional and moral contexts and on applying sound critical thinking skills to a problem. Topics covered include professional codes of ethics, safety-critical systems, whistle blowing, privacy and surveillance, freedom of speech, intellectual property, and cross-cultural issues. This course relies heavily on case studies of real-world incidents.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40232 - Software Engineering
Software engineering is an engineering discipline that is concerned with all aspects of producing high-quality, cost-effective, and maintainable software systems. This course provides an introduction to the most important tasks of a software engineer: requirements engineering, software design, implementation and testing, documentation, and project management. A medium-scale design project combined with individual assignments complement the lectures.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40236 - Optimization for Big Data Applications
Large complex systems can be modeled using the discoverable relationships and constraints amongst their derived big data sets. Engineers and decision makers may wish to identify designs and actions that yield optimal outcomes for those systems. The course will introduce the student to methods used to formulate and solve big data optimizations: linear, integer, and nonlinear systems, especially constrained systems. The course will include readings about cases studies and use several open source and commercial packages to solve representative problems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40243 - Compilers and Language Design
An introduction to the design and implementation of computer languages. Students will design and implement a compiler from scratch for a new language, while learning about tradeoffs between usability, performance, and complexity in language design. Specific topics include scanning, parsing, grammar classes, type systems, garbage collection, translation, and code generation. A significant amount of software development is required and students will gain considerable experience in software engineering practices.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40277 - Applied Pattern Recognition
Pattern recognition is defined as the assignment of a label to a given value. Pattern recognition techniques are used in a number of applications, including biometrics, document analysis, image analysis, and event classification. This course will introduce the fundamentals of pattern recognition with a primary focus on statistical based techniques and their application to various problem domains. Methods for analyzing multi-dimensional data of different types and scales along with algorithms for projection, dimensionality reduction, clustering, and classification of data will be discussed. The overall goals of this course are to understand the process of pattern recognition as well as the limitations of various methods. The course objectives include to provide students with the scientific foundations needed to design, implement, and evaluate an automated pattern classification system. Prior experience with Matlab is assumed.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40333 - Mobile Application Projects
This course will provide comprehensive project experience in development of mobile applications on the Android platform. Students will receive intensive tutorial introductions, covering hardware capabilities and limitations, the development environment, and the communications infrastructure available on campus to support networking. A few programming exercises will be assigned so that students can demonstrate basic development proficiency. The remainder of the course will be devoted to project work. The project concepts will be developed by students based on open problems posed by the instructor. Teams of three students will work on each project concept taking it from ideation to development. Development activity will include generation of design documentation, including specifications, UI mockups, state diagrams for execution and communications, presentations, and reports at various stages. At the conclusion of the course, students will demonstrate their solutions to public at an TBD event on campus.
3.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
6.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40367 - Introduction to Digital Forensics
This course will provide students with an introduction to digital forensic science and the systematic process of acquiring, authenticating and analyzing digital evidence. We will concentrate on understanding how computer technology creates electronic evidence and how it is stored. Technical and managerial topics will be explored, providing students with both theoretical and practical experience using forensic hardware and software. Students will learn about and use forensics software/tool kits to analyze and recover potential evidence in file systems, memory, registry, networks, browsers, email, and mobile devices. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be well trained as next-generation computer crime investigators and be prepared for active research at the forefront in the areas studied.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40424 - Human Computer Interaction
You will engage in an in-depth exploration of the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) including its history, goals, principles, methodologies, successes, failures, open problems, and emerging areas. Broad topics include theories of interaction (e.g., conceptual models, stages of execution, error analysis, constraints, memory by affordances), design methods (e.g., user-centered design, task analysis, prototyping tools), visual design principles (e.g., visual communication, digital typography, color, motion), evaluation techniques (e.g., heuristic evaluations, model-based evaluations), and emerging topics (e.g., affective computing, natural user interfaces, brain-computer interfaces).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40437 - Social Sensing and Cyber-Physical Systems
Online social media (e.g., Twitter, Facebook), smartphones, and ubiquitous internet connectivity have greatly facilitated data sharing at scale, allowing for a firehose of human and sensor observations to pour in about the physical world in real-time. This opens up unprecedented challenges and opportunities in the field of social sensing and cyber-physical systems where the goal is to efficiently organize the real-time data feeds and accurately reconstruct the "states of the world," both physical and social. This course offers students the opportunity to learn the theoretical foundations, state-of-the-art techniques, and hands-on experience in this exciting area. The topic of this class is timely due to the increasing interest in online social networks, big data, and human-in-the-loop systems, as well as the proliferation of computing artifacts that interact with or monitor the physical world. In particular, the class contains four main components: (i) the introduction to social sensing and cyber-physical systems; (ii) key technical challenges (e.g., big data analytics, system reliability, user mobility, energy, privacy, etc.); (iii) state-of-art techniques and systems (e.g., MapReduce/Hadoop, fact-finding, data cube, etc); (iv) emerging applications (smartphone-based crowdsensing, online social media sensing, participatory/opportunistic sensing, intelligent transportation, smart buildings, body area networks etc). The students will have the opportunities to work with real world social sensing and cyber-physical system problems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40443 - Heterogeneous Computing
A senior/graduate level course intended to expose students to both fundamental approaches and cutting-edge research results in heterogeneous computing. Heterogeneous computing refers to approaches that leverage different computer architectures, such as CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs to accomplish some common goal. CMOS scaling trends and stringent power requirements have greatly increased the popularity of heterogeneous computing systems. However, realizing the potential of heterogeneous computing systems is a big challenge. In this course, students will learn the basic performance and power considerations of heterogeneous computing latforms, how to program such systems, as well as some advanced optimization techniques. Representative research papers in these areas will be studied. The course will culminate with an end-of-semester project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40462 - VLSI Circuit Design
CMOS devices and circuits, scaling and design rules, floor planning, data and control flow, synchronization and timing. Individual design projects.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40497 - Web Science and Information Retrieval
Information and Web Science refers to the processing, indexing and querying of unstructured or loosely structured information on the Web. This course will focus on the theory and practice of search engines for retrieving textual information. Basic and advanced topics in Web science will be covered, with emphasis on newer technologies that go beyond simple keyword search. Programming assignments will provide hands-on experience with retrieval systems. More advanced research in Web science will be stimulated through the means of a class project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40522 - Computer Engineering Capstone Design
This course provides a comprehensive team-based design experience of a selected digital electronic system. Projects involve design concept selection, development of specification, design, prototype implementation, and documentation. Group project management skills, including scheduling and project tracking are stressed. Project assessment includes external reviews.
4.000 Credit hours
4.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40532 - Bioinformatics Computing
Subject matter changes depending on students' needs. Prospective topics include specific diseases (e.g., Malaria, dengue), molecular genetics of vectors, bioinformatics, and others. (On demand).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40535 - Special Studies: Computer Vision
Computer Vision is the science and technology of giving computers the ability to "see" and "understand" images taken by one or more cameras. The goal of this course is to study algorithms and methods for interpreting the visual world captured in images or videos. The course is divided into four parts: The first part gives a general introduction. It discusses the research frontiers in computer vision by showing some state-of-the-art applications (e.g., detection and recognition, automated visual inspection and 3D reconstruction). The second part explains the basics of how to deal with digital images. It includes image formation, image acquisition, image processing (enhancement, filtering, morphological operations, edge detection and segmentation) and video processing (optical flow and tracking). The third part focuses on automatic recognition of patterns. It covers feature extraction and selection, local descriptors and classification algorithms. In this part we will also discuss briefly how to apply deep learning techniques, especially convolutional neural networks, in computer vision. Finally, the fourth part considers geometric vision topics. It consists of projective geometry, camera geometric model, camera calibration, stereovision and 3D reconstruction. After this course students will be able to understand computer vision literature, recognize the frontiers of state-of-the-art computer vision systems and develop algorithms that are essential to many modern systems in this field. Projects and practical classes will utilize high-level programming languages (Matlab and Python) and popular computer visions tools, such as OpenCV. Elementary skills in Matlab and Python programming are necessary to attend the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40537 - Biometrics
The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of automatic biometric authentication. The course will study those biometric modalities which have commercial implementations (such as fingerprints, face, iris, voice, finger veins, handwritten signatures), as well as emerging techniques (such as brain or thermal signals). We will discuss hopes, fears, limitations and strengths related to the presented modalities, including biometric data aging, "reverse engineering" of biometric templates or possibility to use biometrics in post-mortem forensic analysis. Important part of this course will be security of biometrics (in particular presentation attack detection) and secure biometric implementations. Where appropriate, current large-scale deployments of biometrics, such as NEXUS program or biometric passports, will be used as illustration of problems discussed in class. The course will also show how to apply statistics for biometric reliability evaluation in a mathematically elegant way. During five practical classes students will interface with up-to-date commercial biometric sensors and collect an authentic biometric data as well as spoofing samples used during homework. For instance, using various computer vision tools and software libraries students will build their own iris, fingerprint and signature recognition systems following real-world implementations of these modalities, additionally resistant to various attacks such as presenting irises printed on a paper or gummy fingers. Practical classes will utilize the software designed in MATLAB and C/C++.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40539 - Topics in Parasitology & VB
This course is cross-listed in the College of Science Biology Department (BIOS_TBD) and the College of Engineering Computer Science Department (CSE40539/CSE60539). The course will cover computer-modeling techniques for simulating the behavior of biological and public health systems. The primary approach will be the individual-based modeling method (sometimes called the agent-based approach). Special focus will be given to modeling various biological systems: for example, the epidemiology of malaria, population ecology, evolutionary dynamics, microbial ecology, genetic regulatory networks, animal behavior, developmental biology, etc. Topics include methods for modeling and simulation, statistical distributions, random variate generation, animation, visualization, design of simulation experiments, verification and validation of simulations, and analysis of results. CSE students will work on collaborative projects with biological sciences majors. Students will be expected to learn about 1) simulation and modeling, 2) to help define biological problems for modeling and simulation, and 3) to help with verification, validation and interpretation of results. (Computer programming on course projects will be done by the computer science students.) A major objective of the course will be to compare the performance of specific biological models when simulated through individual-based versus more traditional approaches.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
PSIM - Poverty Studies Elect.

CSE 40567 - Computer Security
This course is a survey of topics in realm of computer security. This course will introduce the students to many contemporary topics in computer security ranging from PKIs (Public Key Infrastructures) to cyber-warfare to security ethics. Students will learn fundamental concepts of security that can be applied to many; traditional aspects of computer programming and computer systems design. The course will culminate in a research project where the student will have an opportunity to more fully investigate a topic related to the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CDCY- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Cybr Secrty, CDDF- Computatnl/Digital Focus, CDTD- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Dev & Mgt, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40586 - Low Vision Mentorship Project in Computer Science Education
In this course, Notre Dame students will be paired with students at the Illinois School for the Visually Impaired (ISVI) who are learning computer programming. ND students will work with the ISVI students to teach computer science, as well as to learn about the barriers to entry faced by low vision students to technology careers. Mentorship activities will be directed and supervised by ND faculty, and course/grade objectives align with outcomes for the ISVI students.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40600 - CSE Service Projects
Engineering Projects in Community Service.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect, ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40613 - Web Applications
Introduction to the concepts and technologies for engineering web software. At the end of this course, students will be initiated in the analysis, design, implementation, and validation of web software. Students will develop a semester-long team project for a real client with a social impact in the community. Individual assignments, quizzes, and participation are also important.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40622 - Cryptography
Concepts and principles of cryptography and data security. Topics covered include: principles of secrecy systems starting from classical ciphers such as Caesar and Vigenere; secret key encryption standards (DES, AES); public key encryption (RSA, ElGamal); information and number theory; hash functions; digital signatures; authentication; key exchange protocols and key certification; network centric protocols.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40625 - Machine Learning
This course on machine learning will give an overview of many concepts, learning theory, techniques, and algorithms in machine learning, such as in reinforcement learning, supervised learning, unsupervised and semi-supervised learning, genetic algorithms, including advanced methods such as sequential learning, active learning, support vector machines, graphical and relational models. The course will give the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The course will also include discussions on some of the recent applications, and the interface with computer vision, systems, bioinformatics, and architecture. The course will have a strong focus on project and assignments, with emphasis on writing implementations of learning algorithms.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40633 - Advanced Mobile Application Development
Application-directed mobile programming, including database-backed mobile applications and API mashups. Development of apps for nonprofit and for-profit mobile programming challenge competitions.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 40647 - Data Science
Data mining uses methods from multiple fields including but not limited to: machine learning, pattern recognition, databases, probability and statistics, information theory and visualization. The focus of this course will primarily be the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from probability, statistics, pattern recognition, and information theory. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts, and also apply them to the real world data sets. It will also touch upon some of the advances in related fields such as web mining, intrusion detection, bioinformatics, etc. In addition, we will discuss the role of data mining in the society.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40655 - Technical Concepts of Visual Effects
This class seeks to introduce students to some basic concepts of computer-generated imagery as it is used in the field of visual effects, and to delve into some of the technical underpinnings of the field. While some focus will rely on artistic critique and evaluation, most of the emphasis of the class will be placed on understanding fundamental concepts of 3d modeling, texturing, lighting, rendering, and compositing. Those who excel in the visual effects industry are those who have both a strong aesthetic sense coupled with a solid understanding of what the software being used is doing "under the hood." This class, therefore, will seek to stress both aspects of the industry. From a methodology standpoint, the class will consist of lectures, several projects that will be worked on both in-class and out of class, scripting, many tutorials, and open discussion.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40657 - Natural Language Processing
Computers process massive amounts of information every day in the form of human language. Although they do not understand it, they can learn how to do things like answer questions about it, or translate it into other languages. This course is a systematic introduction to the ideas that form the foundation of current language technologies and research into future language technologies.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40677 - Open Source Software Development
Students will work as a team to construct a significant open source software product over the course of a semester. In addition to the software itself, students will develop the infrastructure necessary to sustain the software as part of an open source community, such as public web pages, documentation, discussion groups, bug tracking, and automated testing. Interested students should first form a small group of 4-6 students willing to work together, and then contact the instructor for permission to register.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 40746 - Advanced Database Projects
Advanced topics in database concepts; the course's main goal is a major final project, where groups will compete for prizes and awards.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40755 - Parallel Computing
This course provides the student with a comprehensive introduction to the the field of parallel computing. From the implicit instruction and data parallelism that is ubiquitous in modern processor designs through to the concurrency inherent in many fundamental numerical and non-numerical algorithms, achieving maximum application performance is only achievable with a thorough understanding of parallel computing architectures, parallel algorithms and their implementation in modern parallel programming languages. After a review of modern high-performance computing systems, students will undertake a tour-de-force of parallel programming models and languages including shared-memory programming with Pthreads, OpenMP and Intel Cilk++, distributed memory programming with MPI and UPC, next-generation parallel programming with Cray Chapel and finally co-processor acceleration using CUDA and/or OpenACC. To complement their parallel programming skills, students will learn the important concepts behind debugging parallel codes as well as profiling and tuning parallel codes to maximize performance. To complete the course students will undertake a survey of important numerical and non-numerical parallel algorithms including their implementation in community-standard libraries e.g. ScaLAPACK, PETSc. Practical exercises that complement the lecture material will be completed on high-performance computing clusters provided by the Center For Research Computing (CRC) as well as national supercomputing resources made available through XSEDE.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40772 - Cloud Computing
As a growing range of applications shift to the cloud, developers face the task of creating reliable, fault-tolerant and secure distributed computing systems and networks. This course covers the key concepts, principles and implementation options for creating high-assurance cloud computing solutions. We will start with a broad technical overview and basic introduction to cloud computing, looking at the overall architecture of the cloud, client systems and the modern Internet and cloud computing data centers. We will then delve into the core challenges of showing how reliability and fault-tolerance can be abstracted, how the resulting questions can be solved, and how the solutions can be leveraged to create a wide range of practical cloud applications. The course will be very practical, and the students will get readily understandable material without any special prerequisite background. Concrete examples will be drawn from real-world settings to illustrate key insights. Various problems regarding cloud applications and cloud reliability will be assigned to students. Topics to be covered include: - Virtualization - Cloud computing reliability from the perspectives of the client and of the network - Cloud data centers components - Building "mission-critical" networked applications that keep working even when things go wrong - Web services, group communication, transactions, peer-to-peer systems, time-critical protocols, scalability and security - Fundamental mechanisms, with an emphasis on the idea of "consistent behavior" in systems that replicate critical components for availability. - Review of wide array of major cloud computing components. - Public-private cloud computing integration - Resource management in cloud computing - Computational Science as a Service
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40773 - Software Projects With Drones
This is a software engineering class in which students will be exposed to development practices as they design, develop, test, and deploy drone-based software applications. Students will leverage the mavlink protocol to communicate between drones and ground stations. They will work in teams to develop mobile and/or server-side applications that utilize drones in a variety of scenarios such as the delivery of medical supplies or aerial reconnaissance.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40814 - Mobile Computing
This course looks at the intersection between mobile computing, mobile telephony, and wireless networking, addressing the unique network protocol challenges and opportunities presented in these fields. While some of the more important physical layer properties of radio communications will be touched, the focus will be on network protocols above the physical layer, particularly media access control, transport protocols, and routing. The course will be project-oriented, giving students an opportunity to work with state-of-the-art mobile computing technology, including cell phone programming, location-aware systems using GPS, and emerging network protocols and applications.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40817 - Healthcare Analytics: A Data-Driven Approach
Healthcare is facing a digital revolution from data collection to its application decision making. The Affordable Care Act has a major provision for electronic health records or EHR (first regulation will be effective Oct 1, 2012). The EHR will not only reduce the paperwork and administrative effort, but it will also lead to a reduction in costs, reduction in errors, improved and standardized data, and the meaningful use of such data will improve the quality of care (preventative medicine). With the availability of the digitized data comes the opportunity of novel large scale analytics towards prospective healthcare --- a personalized assessment of one's health, along with a sundry of recommended lifestyle changes. Meaningful use of the electronic health care data is to not only take a giant leap towards personalized and prospective health care, but also reduce the healthcare costs by designing a better disease management strategy, leading to lifestyle adjustments and pre-emptive measures. Personalized medicine integrates genetic, genomic, and clinical information to predict a person's likelihood of developing a disease, its onset course, and potential treatment plans. The course will bring together the intersection of medicine and computational thinking for the grand challenge problems in healthcare. It will focus on aspects of information technology or informatics in EHR (design and development, current practices, standards and terminology), integration with genetic/genomic data, relevant concepts of data mining and analytics (including visualization) for evidence based medicine, prospective healthcare and personalized medicine, social networks for health, and privacy and ethics. The course will also feature talks from leaders in healthcare sector. The course will have a strong focus on case studies and project. The students will have the opportunities to work on real data-driven problems for healthcare
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40822 - Cloud Computing
This course introduces fundamentals and applications of cloud computing intended primarily for computer science and computer engineering majors. Core concepts of virtualization, cloud infrastructure components, and cloud services will be covered. Specific areas of discussion include virtual machine performance, cloud management interfaces, network and storage infrastructure, IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, QoS, Cloud Security, and hybrid cloud models. Students will have the opportunity to apply their understanding of cloud infrastructure in practice through course projects with access to both campus and commercial cloud services.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40838 - Data Visualization
Introduction to data visualization with a particular emphasis on the interactive visualization of abstract data sources. You will study how to use visual representations and interaction techniques to help people analyze, understand, and communicate complex data. You will learn how to choose appropriate representations and how to design novel representations as well as how to build and evaluate your designs. Topics include design and evaluation methodology, visualization programming using D3.js, visualization design principles and guidelines, idiomatic representations for various types of data including parallel coordinates plots, radar charts, graph and tree representations (node-link, matrix, treemap), time-series, geospatial, and text representations. Students will have the opportunity to learn, implement, and apply visualization techniques through review of state-of-the-art literature, homework assignments, and a class project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40842 - Hackers in the Bazaar
This a CSE elective course that explores the idea of a "hacker" and the practice of participating in the open source "bazaar". To examine the sociology of hackers, we will read, discuss, and reflect on books such as "Hackers and Painters", "The Cathedral and the Bazaar", and "Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution". Additionally, students will apply the ideas and concepts explored in these books by contributing to different open source projects. Finally, students will develop a project of their own design by employing the open source development methodology.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40849 - Video Game Design
This course introduces students to the design and implementation of video games. Video games are one of the most popular types of software, bringing together many disciplines such as gameplay design, storytelling, real-time graphics, physics modeling, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. Video games are used not only in the entertainment industry, but also in education, training, rehabilitation, and social networking, among other areas. Through a mix of lectures, case studies, and projects, students will get practical experience on game-play design and video-game construction in an object-oriented language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40868 - Neural Networks
Neural networks are computer models inspired by our understanding of how human brain learns and processes an acquired information. This introductory course will guide you through different neural architectures suitable for various applications. We will start with bio-inspired modeling of neurons (inputs, activation function) and discuss how to use them to build artificial networks (connections, layers). The course will present structures used in supervised learning, that is static networks (Rosenblatt perceptron, Adaline, multi-layer perceptron, radial networks, deep networks including recently popular convolutional nets) and dynamic networks (recurrent networks, associative memory, Hopfield's and Boltzman's machines). Next the networks used in unsupervised learning will be discussed, such as self-organizing maps, Kohonen's networks and structures based on adaptive resonance theory (ART). The course will show how to efficiently apply different types of artificial neural networks in approximation and classification tasks and dynamic systems. We will discuss appropriate learning strategies for each of these applications and their details, such as gradient estimation and minimization techniques. Semester projects will be focused on solving real classification tasks related to computer vision area and with the use of up-to-date neural network software.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40877 - Educational Game Design
This class will work as a team to design and develop an educational video game for a local school. The class will explore various game mechanics, build both physical and digital prototypes, and collaborate as an acting software development team while creating the game. As a team, the group will follow an agile methodology and use Scrum to plan and implement the product. The class will interact with the local school and have the students play test the game throughout the semester.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40884 - Network Science
Networks are everywhere! Networks (graphs) can be used to elegantly model and analyze real-world phenomena in various domains. Examples are the Internet, Facebook, cell phone communications, airline routes, stock markets, disease spread, brain, molecular interactions between genes/proteins in a cell etc. Networks are important! For example, both graphite and diamond are composed of carbon atoms, but what gives them different properties (graphite being soft and dark, diamond being hard and clear) is the connections (links) between the atoms, i.e., the network. So, what is network science about? This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the different types of real-world networks. Also, the course will introduce state-of-the-art computational approaches for network analysis. Because of the increasing complexity of the real-world network data, in order to analyze the networks efficiently, these approaches will span many fields, e.g., algorithms, graph theory, data mining, machine learning, pattern recognition, information theory, big data, probability and statistics, and visualization. Vibrant network science topics that will be explored include: network properties and measures of network structure, network modeling, network evolution (i.e., dynamic network analysis), link prediction, community detection (i.e., clustering), network comparison and alignment, network integration (i.e., heterogeneous network analysis), and network visualization. While the course will encompass traditional course activities (lectures, homeworks, and exams), the focus will be on getting practical hands-on experience in analyzing real-world network data through a course project, reading latest research papers on network science and its real-life applications in a variety of domains, and active in-class discussion of the papers
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40910 - Topics in Mathematical Logic
This is a first course in mathematical logic aimed at senior level mathematics students but also suitable for students from philosophy and computer science. The course is about what it means for a statement, in a suitable formalism (propositional or predicate logic) to be true, false, tautological, etc. and what methods there are for checking or proving this. More precisely the course will include the syntax and semantics of propositional and predicate logic, as well as proof systems and completeness theorems. Included among texts that may be used for the course are (i) A mathematical introduction to logic, by Herbert Enderton. (ii) Logic for Computer Scientists, by Uwe Sch (iii) Logic for mathematics and computer science, by Stanley Burris. The book (i) is a traditional treatment of the subject. Books (ii) and (iii) include the resolution method or calculus for checking unsatisfiability, which is related to logic programming and automated reasoning.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40923 - Case Studies in Computing-Based Entrepreneurship
The purpose of this course is to Inform, Introduce and (hopefully) Inspire you. You will become Informed about computing-based entrepreneurship case studies across a wide variety of areas: computer software, computer hardware, healthcare technologies, databases, web services, data analytics and more. You will also become Informed about different aspects of the entrepreneurship challenge. You will be Introduced to guest speakers who are, or who have been, principals in developing technology, founding companies, running companies, selecting technologies for venture capital investment, etc. As a result, you will hopefully be Inspired to consider pursuing computing-based entrepreneurship opportunity.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CDDF- Computatnl/Digital Focus, CDTD- Cmp&Dgtl Tch Dev & Mgt, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40924 - Entrepreneurship: Building a High-Tech Startup
This course will cover formulation of the "idea" for the startup, attributes of successful tech startups, understanding the market, structuring the company, building a team and organization, financial indicators, launching, early marketing and growth, and business plan structure.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40935 - CyberSecurity Case Studies
The availability of mission-critical web applications, computer systems, and associated infrastructure components is a major requirement for the viability of an organization. A cyber-attack or disaster could negate the capability of an organization to provide uninterrupted computer system availability and service to its customers, suppliers and vendors. This includes computer systems that control critical U.S. infrastructure (i.e., transportation, electric grid, energy systems). Students will learn about the threats and vulnerabilities that could impact mission critical systems and the countermeasures that can be implemented to reduce/mitigate risk. Techniques will be taught for conducting a risk assessment, preparing a security architecture blueprint, and developing a continuity plan. Skills will be acquired through a series of case studies, workshops, and projects. Students will work in groups. Workshops include: performing a business impact analysis, preparing an incident response plan, developing strategies (including cloud services) for systems and network recovery, and preparing a disaster recovery plan according to industry standards and best practices.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ENST - Energy Studies, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40943 - Autonomous Mobile Robots
This course introduces the fundamental computational problems of autonomous mobile robots, including locomotion, sensing, perception, control, mapping, and planning. We will also explore current research topics in the field, such as social robotics, healthcare robotics, and driverless cars. Because robotics is an inherently physical science, this course is entirely group project-based, and students will practice concepts learned in class on Turtlebot robots during weekly programming assignments. The class also has a final capstone project that includes an exhibition at the Annual Notre Dame National Robotics Week Event (ND-NRW) in April, a community science outreach event.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40964 - Human Factors of Computer Systems
Students will engage in an in-depth exploration of the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) including its history, goals, principles, methodologies, successes, failures, open problems, and emerging areas. Broad topics include theories of interaction (e.g., conceptual models, stages of execution, error analysis, constraints, memory by affordances), design methods (e.g., user-centered design, task analysis, prototyping tools), visual design principles (e.g., visual communication, digital typography, color, motion), evaluation techniques (e.g., heuristic evaluations, model-based evaluations), and emerging topics (e.g., affective computing, natural user interfaces).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 40974 - Gateways for Big Data
Advanced technologies and experimental methods lead to an unprecedented demand for large-scale data management and analysis. This course provides the student with an comprehensive introduction to concepts and implementations of gateways for Big Data. In general, a gateway provides a single point of entry to a set of computational tools and data of a specific application domain while hiding the complex underlying infrastructure from the user. The overall goal of gateways is to increase the usability of applications and to offer intuitive user interfaces tailored to the communities' needs. Developers of such gateways have to tackle diverse aspects: from security through tool and workflow provisioning to distributed data management capabilities. Mature frameworks, libraries and portals (e.g., the Galaxy web-based platform) have been evolving to aid developers addressing challenges in these fields. The course focuses on the diverse aspects and concepts of gateways especially in the context of Big Data in bioinformatics. Besides the theoretical foundation, students will have practical exercises to apply distributed computing infrastructures and to integrate applications, workflows and data into a gateway.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 44071 - Collective Intelligence
To many the promise of artificial intelligence (AI) - the creation of a computational intelligence to rival our own - represents the holy grail of computer science and almost every computer science curriculum will include modules to cover the state-of-the-art in AI tools and techniques. However recently there has been a subtle but important shift in the way that humans and machines can combine their efforts to solve challenging problems. Instead of developing stand-alone AI algorithms capable of complex problem solving, planning, learning, and even perception, researchers and engineers have recognised the power of the Web as a platform for so-called collective intelligence, where humans and machines can combine their different skills to solve problems that are otherwise beyond the research of modern AI. This course will explore this new science of collective intelligence, providing concrete examples of how some of the most complex problems (e.g., understanding images, reading text, translating speech, recognising relevant information, answering questions, even predicting future events etc) can be successfully solved by harnessing the collective intelligence of the Web. The course will also consider how the business of the Web has adapted to take advantage of collective intelligence with special attention paid to some of the emerging business models that have developed as a result. This course will include substantial coursework and a Java-based programming project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 44166 - Introduction to Graphics
Taguht at a host institution. This unit teaches the fundamentals of computer-generated three-dimensional graphics for applications in creating interactive virtual environments. The unit starts with an introduction to the virtual image formation process using a synthetic camera model. The openGL API is introduced next along with the GLUT API for writing interactive graphics programs. The concepts of vector and affine spaces are introduced next with an emphasis on using the homogeneous co-ordinate system for the affine transformations used in the openGL API. The unit ends with a thorough discussion of different lighting and shading models in the openGL API. The practical component of the unit involves developing a realistic three-dimensional application using the core concepts covered in the unit.
3.000 OR 3.750 Credit hours
3.000 OR 3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAS-St. Andrews, Scotland(AS), ZOBM - Bremen Germany (BM), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44171 - Artificial Intelligence
Taught at a host institution. This unit considers the problem of building 'intelligent agents'. It involves the study of structures and algorithms that allow an agent to act rationally in the world while given only partial information about the world. Topics covered include search, two-player game algorithms, sequential decision problems, machine learning, knowledge representation and reasoning, and planning. The topics are supported by hands-on programming projects that put the theory into practice.
3.000 TO 3.750 Credit hours
3.000 TO 3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAS-St. Andrews, Scotland(AS), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44175 - Computing and Society
Students will explore the interactions and impacts of computing & information technologies on social systems. They will examine how technological paradigms transform industries, organizations and individuals, and vice versa; how policies and social norms are developed as they relate to technology use; and investigate the emerging controversies surrounding the regulation of technology in society. Emphasis is placed on establishing an in-depth understanding of the professional and ethical responsibilities of computing professionals, and developing an ability to analyze the impact of computing technologies on a local and global scale. Historical and contemporary studies, cases and examples will be used extensively.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOES - Edinburgh, Scotland(ES), ZOOX - Oxford University (OX), ZOSI- National U. of Singapore

CSE 44232 - Software Engineering Project
A group project in software engineering building a complete system based on the application of analysis, design, and implementation techniques.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours

Levels: St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOCU - HKU Hong, Kong(CU), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 44367 - Computer Forensics
Taught at a host institution. This course is an introduction to computer forensics and security. Students are only required to have basic ICT skills to take this course. The course covers the following topics.1. Types of cybercrime including: a. Malware: viruses, trojans, worms, adware etc b. Online criminality - Hacking, phishing, auction fraud, common scams c. Illegal content: child pornography; Copyright violation:software/music/movie piracy2. Personal computer security - best practice: Anti-virus software, firewalls,automatic upgrades, email attachments; wireless security3. Introduction to computer forensics - preserving and analysing digitalevidence; disk imaging; electronic data recovery;4. Crytography & Steganography5. Legal aspects: Data Protection; data privacy6. Safe online behaviour: chat, instant messaging, social networking, unsafeweb sites;7. What to do in the event of computer crime.Lecture attendance is MANDATORY as much of the learning is derived from grourp work in the lectures.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 44431 - Principles of Programming Languages
Taught in Dublin, Ireland - UCD Program
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOES - Edinburgh, Scotland(ES), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 44462 - VLSI Circuit Design
This unit develops in-depth technical competence in the design and synthesis of digital integrated circuits (ICs). The topics covered include IC manufacturing technology, layout and design rules, static and dynamic logic, arithmetic blocks, transistor sizing and propagation delay, optimisation for performance (speed, area and power), memories, floor planning, clocking, interconnect issues and challenges of future IC design. Students make extensive use of computer-aided design (CAD), IC design and verification tools through the IC design project. Students are able to (1) design and optimise digital IC for performance (speed, power, silicon area); (2) apply advanced MOSFET modelling to evaluate circuit performance; (3) produce a layout (or blue print) of a digital IC for subsequent fabrication; (4) proficiency with industry standard IC design tools; (5) explain IC manufacturing process and associated technological challenges; and (6) contribute effectively as a member of a project team and communicate results through a concise technical report and technical oral presentation.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44535 - Computer Vision
Computer Vision is the science and technology of giving computers the ability to see and understand images taken by one or more cameras. The goal of this course is to study and develop algorithms for interpreting the visual world captured in images or videos. The course is divided into four parts: The first part gives a general introduction. It discusses the research frontiers in computer vision by showing some state-of-the-art applications (e.g., detection and recognition, automated visual inspection, 3D reconstruction and image stitching). The second part explains the basics of how to deal with digital images. It includes image formation, image acquisition, image processing (enhancement, filtering, morphological operations, edge detection and segmentation) and video processing (optical flow and tracking). The third part focuses on automatic recognition of patterns. It covers feature extraction and selection, local descriptors and classification algorithms. Finally, the third part treats geometric vision topics. It consists of projective geometry, camera geometric model, camera calibration, stereovision and 3D reconstruction. With this course the students will be able to understand computer vision literature, recognize the frontiers of state-of-the-art computer vision systems and develop algorithms that are essential to many modern systems in this field. Projects in the course will utilize a high level programming language (preferably Matlab, but other languages like OpenCV, Python or C++ will be allowed also).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CPEE - CPEG Free Elective Seq., ZOAC-Alcoy, Spain(AC), ZOLA - London, Eng-Fall/Spring

CSE 44567 - Computer Security
Taught as CS420 3 -'Computer Security' at a host insititution. This module introduces the basic concepts of computer security and cryptography, common attacks and defences against them, and relevant legal and policy frameworks.
3.000 TO 3.750 Credit hours
3.000 TO 3.750 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAS-St. Andrews, Scotland(AS), ZOCU - HKU Hong, Kong(CU), ZOSI- National U. of Singapore

CSE 44613 - Web Applications
Introduction to the concepts and technologies for engineering web software. At the end of this course, students will be initiated in the analysis, design, implementation, and validation of web software.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAC-Alcoy, Spain(AC), ZOCU - HKU Hong, Kong(CU), ZOHK - Hong Kong, China (HK), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA), ZORE - Rome, Italy - UG (RE)

CSE 44625 - Machine Learning
The objective of this module is to familiarise students with the fundamental theoretical concepts in machine learning, as well as instructing students in the practical aspects of applying machine learning techniques to real datasets. Key techniques in supervised machine learning will be covered. These include k-Nearest Neighbour classifiers, Decision Trees, and Naive Bayes classification. In unsupervised machine learning, a number of popular clustering algorithms will be presented in detail (e.g. k-Means Clustering, Hierarchical Clustering). Additional topics covered include ensemble learning, dimension reduction, and network analysis. This module has a practical focus and students will be expected to complete three coursework assignments, each involving the analysis of data using machine learning methods and the interpretation of the outputs of those methods. COMP30120 requires significant mathematical ability, as some of the algorithms require an understanding of linear algebra and statistical concepts.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOES - Edinburgh, Scotland(ES), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR)

CSE 44647 - Data Exploration and Mining
Taught as CITS3401 - 'Data Exploration and Mining' at a host institution. This unit introduces the key mechanisms in data warehousing, OLAP and data mining. It discusses logical and physical design of data warehouses including star schema, snowflake schema, data marts, partitioning and materialised views. Students study the use of data warehouses through a study of the OLAP technology including the multidimensional OLAP (MOLAP) and relational OLAP (ROLAP) architectures, OLAP operations and structure query language (SQL) support for OLAP. They learn modern data mining methods including clustering, association rule mining and machine learning techniques.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44648 - Data Science (Online)
Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame.

Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

Students enrolling in this course should have taken one or more courses or implemented one or more projects involving Python programming and one or more courses in probability or statistics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
OLF-Fully Online (100 percent), ZOOL-OnlineLearning (inactive)

CSE 44732 - Software Requirements and Design
Taught as CITS4401 - 'Software Requirements and Design' at a host insitution. This unit introduces the theory and practice of software requirements and design. It aims to equip graduates of the Master of Professional Engineering in the Software Engineering specialisation with the ability to select, evaluate and apply appropriate requirements and design techniques for software projects. The content comprises (1) requirements engineering¿elicitation, analysis, specification, documentation and evolution; (2) software design¿using formal rationale to document design decisions; design constraints including reliability, availability, maintainability; (3) software architectures¿monolithic, distributed, client/server, event driven; and (4) design patterns¿observer; abstract factory, adapter; bridge and facade.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44755 - Parallel Computing
In Perth: High performance computing is an integral part of modern scientific and engineering education and research. Most physical systems are explored through simulation and modelling using high performance computing tools like parallel computers. This unit introduces students to the essential tools and techniques of high performance computing. The main objectives are to introduce students to different frameworks of parallel and distributed computing that they can use in their specific areas of interest. The students learn to program multi-core processors as well as clusters of personal computers using the widely used C and Fortran computer languages. Students program practical problems from different scientific disciplines and also work on individual or group projects to consolidate their learning. CITS3402 introduces the key concepts of high performance computing in an easy-paced manner. Initially the basic ideas in multi-core computer architectures are explored through simple programming examples using OpenMP. In particular, the emphasis will be on improving the performance of the most compute-intensive parts of a program, loops. The lectures will cover the spawning of multiple threads on multiple cores through extensive examples. Next, the key problem in multi-core programming, cache coherency will be explored thoroughly. Distributed memory architectures and their programming through Message Passing Interface (MPI) will be discussed in the second part of the unit. Finally, combining both OpenMP and MPI for improving performance on a cluster of multicore processors will be covered. In Dublin UCD: The module introduces into parallel programming. It covers the following main topics: -Vector and superscalar processors: architecture and programming model, optimizing compilers (dependency analysis and code generation), array libraries (BLAS), parallel languages (Fortran 90, C[]). - Shared-memory multi-processors and multicores: architecture and programming models, optimizing compilers, thread libraries (Pthreads), parallel languages (OpenMP). - Distributed-memory multi-processors: architecture and programming model, performance models, message-passing libraries (MPI), parallel languages (HPF).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44777 - Professional Computing
This unit teaches communication skills, an appreciation of the ethical and social implications of computing projects, and skills in project management and quality assurance. A number of lectures are given to introduce the principles of project management and the fundamental ethical and social principles involved in large-scale computing projects. The bulk of the unit is then taken up with a large group project, involving about six students per group. The project gives the students opportunities to practise various project management techniques and communication skills introduced in the lectures in a technical context.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44814 - Mobile Computing
Taught at a host institution. "This course provides an introduction to mobile device programming. The course will cover topics related to the hardware of modern mobile devices, various operating systems, sensors, and how to access and manager these resources from the point of view of a mobile developer. The course has a large practical component that focuses on implementing various tasks using the Android platform. In particular, students use Android Studio and programs are tested using an emulator. As examples, the course covers the Activity life cycle of android applications, local storage and storage to SD cards, as well as some network programming.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAC-Alcoy, Spain(AC)

CSE 44838 - Computer Analysis and Visualisation
Taught at a host institution. In this unit, students develop an understanding of scientific computing and modelling, analysis, problem solving and visualisation. They understand the approach of computational modelling; have strong programming skills in Excel, MATLAB and Mathematica in data analysis modelling; understand limitations and uncertainty in models; devise and implement computational models; analyse data and hypotheses; are aware of reliability and correctness; and are able to perform simulation and testing.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44843 - Robotics and Automation
This unit covers mobile robot design - driving robots, walking robots, autonomous planes, underwater robots; manipulators; kinematics and control; localisation; navigation; mapping; vision-guidance and tracking; simulation systems; intelligent control - fuzzy logic, neural networks, genetic algorithms; industrial automation and application areas; production lines; process automation and planning. Students acquire generic skills in identifying problems and deriving a specification, creating a system design comprising mechanics, electronics and software for a problem specification, adapting to new systems or tools, and working with and understanding technical manuals. This is a rapidly expanding area which students are encouraged to explore further and keep up with technology trends.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44849 - Video Game Design
Taught at a host institution. "This course provides an introduction to video game programming, as well as a brief history of the evolution of video games and various game engines. Programming is done in C#. In particular, this course is focused on creating a simple video game using the video game engine Unity3D. The course covers the concepts of simulation of collisions, 3D models, textures, lighting, audio, basic AI, and animation. Different development platforms including computers, consoles, the web, and mobile devices are discussed. "
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOAC-Alcoy, Spain(AC)

CSE 44901 - Undergraduate Research
A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
OLF-Fully Online (100 percent), ZOIR - Dublin, Ireland (IR), ZOLA - London, Eng-Fall/Spring, ZOOL-OnlineLearning (inactive), ZOPA - Perth, Australia (PA)

CSE 44999 - Info Security for the Internet
On completion of this module, students should have gained an overall introduction to the theory and applications of cryptography - the science of secrecy. They will: - gain an understanding of the fundamental concepts concerning computer and network security; - have an understanding of the mathematics and the algorithms behind several well known cryptosystems; - conceptually identify vulnerabilities, including recent attacks, involving the Internet of Things; - conceptually describe countermeasures for Internet of Things devices; - develop critical thinking skills.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 46101 - Directed Readings
This course consists of directed readings in Computer Science Engineering.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lecture hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 46102 - Directed Readings-Quantum Computing
Learning about quantum computing, specifically from a computer science perspective, rather than a quantum mechanics perspective. Discussion will include quantum circuits and gates and figuring out how they all work together.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 47900 - Special Studies
Individual or small group study under the direction of a CSE faculty member in an undergraduate subject not currently covered by any University course.
0.000 TO 10.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 10.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 47935 - CyberSecurity Case Studies
The availability of mission-critical web sites, computer systems, and associated infrastructure components is a major requirement for the viability of an organization. A cyber-attack or disaster could negate the capability of an organization to provide uninterrupted computer system availability and service to its customers, suppliers and vendors. This includes computer systems that control critical US infrastructure (i.e., transportation, power, energy systems). This course provides an analysis of the requirements for business continuity and disaster recovery planning related to mission critical computer systems. Students will learn how to identify vulnerabilities and implement countermeasures to reduce/mitigate risk. Techniques will be taught for creating a continuity plan and the methodology for building an infrastructure that supports its effective implementation. Skills will be acquired through a series of interactive case studies and workshops. Students will work in groups and design and develop a disaster recovery plan. Workshops include: performing a threat and impact analysis, selecting disaster recovery sites and technology, planning the disaster recovery project, developing strategies for systems and telecommunications recovery, organizing a team structure for use in an emergency and developing a disaster recovery plan according to industry standards and best practices. At the end of the course students should be able to: - Describe various types of cyber-attacks and disasters that could effect computer systems and their associated risks. - Understand how to conduct a risk assessment and the countermeasures that should be implemented to reduce/mitigate risk. - Apply lessons learned from real-world situations to present-day business continuity planning and disaster recovery scenarios. - Understand the methodologies used in developing business continuity and disaster recovery plans. - Be aware of organizational, procedural, and technical requirements for maintaining continuity of computer operations. - Develop a comprehensive business continuity/disaster recovery plan according to industry standards and best practices.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 48900 - Undergraduate Research
A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.
0.000 TO 10.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 10.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 48901 - Undergraduate Research
A research project at the undergraduate level under the supervision of a CSE faculty member.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Undergraduate Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
CPTE - CPEG Technical Elect

CSE 60100 - Law 2.0: Technology's Impact on Law Practice
The pace of change in the legal system is picking up, and the contrasts between old and new methodologies are increasingly at odds. It's not just cloud-based e-discovery or online legal service delivery. The application of new technologies shows up in legal research, dispute resolution, patent and contract portfolio analysis, etc. The new tools include search, natural language processing, machine learning, expert systems, visualization, user-centered design, and on and on. All the while, we see entrenched interests trying to hold back the tide. This class puts these changes, barriers, and possibilities in context. Each session includes a notable guest speaker to explain new techniques, application areas, and/or the drivers and impact of New Law. Previous guest speakers have included venture capitalists, professors, legal tech startup founders, corporate and legal aid clients, Big Law CIOs, and more. The class explores what's working and what's broken, as well as what both law students and engineers need to know to work with, thrive under, and even create, a truly modern legal system - Law 2.0. There are no prerequisites for this class (open to law students and C.S. grads).
2.000 Credit hours
2.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 60111 - Complexity and Algorithms
A study of theoretical foundations of computer science and a selection of important algorithm techniques. Topics include the classes of P and NP, the theory of NP-completeness, linear programming, advanced graph algorithms, parallel algorithms, approximation algorithms, and randomized algorithms. (Spring)
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate, Law
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60121 - Computer Architecture
Introduction to basic architectural concepts that are present in current scalar machines, together with an introduction to assembly language programming, computer arithmetic, and performance evaluation. Commercial computer-aided-design software is used to deepen the student's understanding of the top-down processor design methodology. MIPS-based assembly language will be used.
4.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
2.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60130 - Finite Elements in Engineering
Fundamental aspects of the finite-element method are developed and applied to the solution of PDEs encountered in science and engineering. Solution strategies for parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic equations are explored. Spring.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60132 - Basic Computing for Bioinformatics
This course will introduce graduate students focusing in the biological sciences to bioinformatics computing. Topics include: the basics of the UNIX command line (with a focus on OSX and Linux), installation of common bioinformatics tools (such as BLAST), basic data analysis/manipulation, and useful programming techniques with an emphasis on scripting languages such as Perl and R. Graduate credit for non-CSE majors only.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60151 - Automated Identity Technology Using Iris Texture
Can the texture pattern of the iris be used to create a reliable, unique identifier for each person on planet Earth? This course explores the technology of iris biometrics in depth: the underlying conceptual theory, image acquisition, image segmentation, texture analysis, matching of texture representations, identity management systems, and a selection of current research issues. The course includes readings from the literature, short writing assignments, and practical experience with current commercial iris biometric technology.
1.500 Credit hours
1.500 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60166 - Computer Graphics
Introduction to interactive computer graphics. Key topics include graphics pipeline, WebGL + GLSL programming, geometric objects and transformation, modeling and viewing, interaction and animation, lighting and shading, and texture mapping. Students are expected to learn fundamental knowledge of computer graphics, essential hands-on experience in WebGL programming, state-of-the-art shader-based, GPU-accelerated graphics, and popular library for cross-browser 3D graphics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60171 - Artificial Intelligence
A broad overview of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI), including its historical and philosophical foundations, classical and contemporary approaches, cognitive systems, and recent trends and applications. Topics include traditional AI techniques (e.g., searching, problem solving, knowledge representation and reasoning, planning, constraint satisfaction, decision making), probabilistic and network based approaches (e.g., Bayesian models, neural networks), computational models of cognition (e.g., models of perception, action, memory, cognitive architectures), and recent developments in natural language processing, speech recognition, robotics, human-computer interaction, machine learning, and computational emotions.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60232 - Software Engineering
Software Engineering is an engineering discipline that is concerned with all aspects of producing high-quality, cost-effective and maintainable software systems. This course provides an introduction to the most important tasks of a software engineer: requirements engineering, software design, implementation and testing, documentation and project management. A medium-scale design project combined with individual assignments complement the lectures.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate, St. Mary's College, Law Doctorate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60236 - Optimization for Big Data Applications
Large complex systems can be modeled using the discoverable relationships and constraints amongst their derived big data sets. Engineers and decision makers may wish to identify designs and actions that yield optimal outcomes for those systems. The course will introduce the student to methods used to formulate and solve big data optimizations: linear, integer, and nonlinear systems, especially constrained systems. The course will include readings about cases studies and use several open source and commercial packages to solve representative problems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60243 - Compilers and Language Design
An introduction to the design and implementation of computer languages. Students will design and implement a compiler from scratch for a new language, while learning about tradeoffs between usability, performance, and complexity in language design. Specific topics include scanning, parsing, grammar classes, type systems, garbage collection, translation, and code generation. A significant amount of software development is required and students will gain considerable experience in software engineering practices.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60246 - Database Concepts
Effective techniques in managing, retrieving and updating information from a database system. Focusing primarily on relational databases, the course presents the entity-relationship model, query processing, and normalization. Topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security will also be discussed. A final project will consist of the design and the implementation of a database system with a Web interface.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60277 - Applied Pattern Recognition
Pattern recognition is defined as the assignment of a label to a given value. Pattern recognition techniques are used in a number of applications, including biometrics, document analysis, image analysis, and event classification. This course will introduce the fundamentals of pattern recognition with a primary focus on statistical based techniques and their application to various problem domains. Methods for analyzing multi-dimensional data of different types and scales along with algorithms for projection, dimensionality reduction, clustering, and classification of data will be discussed. The overall goals of this course are to understand the process of pattern recognition as well as the limitations of various methods. The course objectives include to provide students with the scientific foundations needed to design, implement, and evaluate an automated pattern classification system. Prior experience with Matlab is assumed.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60314 - Computational Thinking for the Biological Sciences
As interdisciplinary research continues to be important, biology and computer science will work together. These collaborations benefit if there is a shared body of knowledge. This course is designed as a primer for several areas of computational science. Pattern recognition, computational simulation and informatics will be introduced along with other, important topics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60321 - Advanced Computer Architecture
Classic high-performance computer architectures are considered along with standard parameters for their evaluation. Characteristics that improve performance are introduced. Various forms of parallel processing with specific implementation examples are given. More recent architectural advances are discussed, such as power-away, Fault Tolerance, and others. (Spring)
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60333 - Mobile Application Projects
This course will provide comprehensive project experience in development of mobile applications on two software platforms: iPhone OS and Android. Students will receive intensive tutorial introductions to each platform, covering hardware capabilities and limitations, the development environment, and the communications infrastructure available on campus to support networking. A few programming exercises will be assigned so that students can demonstrate basic development proficiency. The remainder of the course will be devoted to project work. Students will then develop project concepts. These concepts, along with others supplied by the instructors and other interested parties, will be assessed by teams of three students and one concept per team will be chosen for development. Development activity will include generation of design documentation, including specifications, UI mockups, state diagrams for execution and communications, presentations, and reports at various stages. During the development phase, teams will meet at least weekly with the instructors and with stakeholders acting as simulated "venture capitalists" funding the work. These meetings will involve a briefing of project status as well as demonstrations, interactions, etc. Each of these interactions will be graded. At the end of the semester, student projects will be evaluated by a jury and a suitable prize will be awarded to the project judged best in quality.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60367 - Introduction to Digital Forensics
This course will provide students with an introduction to digital forensic science and the systematic process of acquiring, authenticating and analyzing digital evidence. We will concentrate on understanding how computer technology creates electronic evidence and how it is stored. Technical and managerial topics will be explored, providing students with both theoretical and practical experience using forensic hardware and software. Students will learn about and use forensics software/tool kits to analyze and recover potential evidence in file systems, memory, registry, networks, browsers, email, and mobile devices. Upon completion of this course, students are expected to be well trained as next-generation computer crime investigators and be prepared for active research at the forefront in the areas studied.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60424 - Human Computer Interaction
You will engage in an in-depth exploration of the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) including its history, goals, principles, methodologies, successes, failures, open problems, and emerging areas. Broad topics include theories of interaction (e.g., conceptual models, stages of execution, error analysis, constraints, memory by affordances), design methods (e.g., user-centered design, task analysis, prototyping tools), visual design principles (e.g., visual communication, digital typography, color, motion), evaluation techniques (e.g., heuristic evaluations, model-based evaluations), and emerging topics (e.g., affective computing, natural user interfaces, brain-computer interfaces).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60437 - Social Sensing and Cyber-Physical Systems
Online social media (e.g., Twitter, Facebook), smartphones, and ubiquitous internet connectivity have greatly facilitated data sharing at scale, allowing for a firehose of human and sensor observations to pour in about the physical world in real-time. This opens up unprecedented challenges and opportunities in the field of social sensing and cyber-physical systems where the goal is to efficiently organize the real-time data feeds and accurately reconstruct the "states of the world," both physical and social. This course offers students the opportunity to learn the theoretical foundations, state-of-the-art techniques, and hands-on experience in this exciting area. The topic of this class is timely due to the increasing interest in online social networks, big data, and human-in-the-loop systems, as well as the proliferation of computing artifacts that interact with or monitor the physical world. In particular, the class contains four main components: (i) the introduction to social sensing and cyber-physical systems; (ii) key technical challenges (e.g., big data analytics, system reliability, user mobility, energy, privacy, etc.); (iii) state-of-art techniques and systems (e.g., MapReduce/Hadoop, fact-finding, data cube, etc); (iv) emerging applications (smartphone-based crowdsensing, online social media sensing, participatory/opportunistic sensing, intelligent transportation, smart buildings, body area networks etc). The students will have the opportunities to work with real world social sensing and cyber-physical system problems.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60443 - Heterogeneous Computing
A senior/graduate level course intended to expose students to both fundamental approaches and cutting-edge research results in heterogeneous computing. Heterogeneous computing refers to approaches that leverage different computer architectures, such as CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs to accomplish some common goal. CMOS scaling trends and stringent power requirements have greatly increased the popularity of heterogeneous computing systems. However, realizing the potential of heterogeneous computing systems is a big challenge. In this course, students will learn the basic performance and power considerations of heterogeneous computing latforms, how to program such systems, as well as some advanced optimization techniques. Representative research papers in these areas will be studied. The course will culminate with an end-of-semester project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60462 - VLSI Circuit Design
CMOS devices and circuits, scaling and design rules, floor planning, data and control flow, synchronization and timing. Individual design projects.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60497 - Web Science and Information Retrieval
Information and Web Science refers to the processing, indexing and querying of unstructured or loosely structured information on the Web. This course will focus on the theory and practice of search engines for retrieving textual information. Basic and advanced topics in Web science will be covered, with emphasis on newer technologies that go beyond simple keyword search. Programming assignments will provide hands-on experience with retrieval systems. More advanced research in Web science will be stimulated through the means of a class project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60532 - Bioinformatics Computing
Subject matter changes depending on students' needs. Prospective topics include specific diseases (e.g., Malaria, dengue), molecular genetics of vectors, bioinformatics, and others. (On demand).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60534 - Computational Thinking for the Biological Sciences
This course is designed as a primer for several areas of computational science. Pattern recognition, computational simulation and informatics will be introduced along with other, important topics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60535 - Computer Vision
Computer Vision is the science and technology of giving computers the ability to "see" and "understand" images taken by one or more cameras. The goal of this course is to study algorithms and methods for interpreting the visual world captured in images or videos. The course is divided into four parts: The first part gives a general introduction. It discusses the research frontiers in computer vision by showing some state-of-the-art applications (e.g., detection and recognition, automated visual inspection and 3D reconstruction). The second part explains the basics of how to deal with digital images. It includes image formation, image acquisition, image processing (enhancement, filtering, morphological operations, edge detection and segmentation) and video processing (optical flow and tracking). The third part focuses on automatic recognition of patterns. It covers feature extraction and selection, local descriptors and classification algorithms. In this part we will also discuss briefly how to apply deep learning techniques, especially convolutional neural networks, in computer vision. Finally, the fourth part considers geometric vision topics. It consists of projective geometry, camera geometric model, camera calibration, stereovision and 3D reconstruction. After this course students will be able to understand computer vision literature, recognize the frontiers of state-of-the-art computer vision systems and develop algorithms that are essential to many modern systems in this field. Projects and practical classes will utilize high-level programming languages (Matlab and Python) and popular computer visions tools, such as OpenCV. Elementary skills in Matlab and Python programming are necessary to attend the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60537 - Biometrics
The aim of this course is to introduce the principles of automatic biometric authentication. The course will study those biometric modalities which have commercial implementations (such as fingerprints, face, iris, voice, finger veins, handwritten signatures), as well as emerging techniques (such as brain or thermal signals). We will discuss hopes, fears, limitations and strengths related to the presented modalities, including biometric data aging, "reverse engineering" of biometric templates or possibility to use biometrics in post-mortem forensic analysis. Important part of this course will be security of biometrics (in particular presentation attack detection) and secure biometric implementations. Where appropriate, current large-scale deployments of biometrics, such as NEXUS program or biometric passports, will be used as illustration of problems discussed in class. The course will also show how to apply statistics for biometric reliability evaluation in a mathematically elegant way. During five practical classes students will interface with up-to-date commercial biometric sensors and collect an authentic biometric data as well as spoofing samples used during homework. For instance, using various computer vision tools and software libraries students will build their own iris, fingerprint and signature recognition systems following real-world implementations of these modalities, additionally resistant to various attacks such as presenting irises printed on a paper or gummy fingers. Practical classes will utilize the software designed in MATLAB and C/C++.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60539 - Topics in Parasitology & VB
This course is cross-listed in the College of Science Biology Department (BIOS_TBD) and the College of Engineering Computer Science Department (CSE40539/CSE60539). The course will cover computer-modeling techniques for simulating the behavior of biological and public health systems. The primary approach will be the individual-based modeling method (sometimes called the agent-based approach). Special focus will be given to modeling various biological systems: for example, the epidemiology of malaria, population ecology, evolutionary dynamics, microbial ecology, genetic regulatory networks, animal behavior, developmental biology, etc. Topics include methods for modeling and simulation, statistical distributions, random variate generation, animation, visualization, design of simulation experiments, verification and validation of simulations, and analysis of results. CSE students will work on collaborative projects with biological sciences majors. Students will be expected to learn about 1) simulation and modeling, 2) to help define biological problems for modeling and simulation, and 3) to help with verification, validation and interpretation of results. (Computer programming on course projects will be done by the computer science students.) A major objective of the course will be to compare the performance of specific biological models when simulated through individual-based versus more traditional approaches.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Undergraduate, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
PSIM - Poverty Studies Elect.

CSE 60567 - Computer Security
This course is a survey of topics in realm of computer security. This course will introduce the students to many contemporary topics in computer security ranging from PKIs (Public Key Infrastructures) to cyber-warfare to security ethics. Students will learn fundamental concepts of security that can be applied to many; traditional aspects of computer programming and computer systems design. The course will culminate in a research project where the student will have an opportunity to more fully investigate a topic related to the course.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60586 - Low Vision Mentorship Project in Computer Science Education
In this course, Notre Dame students will be paired with students at the Illinois School for the Visually Impaired (ISVI) who are learning computer programming. ND students will work with the ISVI students to teach computer science, as well as to learn about the barriers to entry faced by low vision students to technology careers. Mentorship activities will be directed and supervised by ND faculty, and course/grade objectives align with outcomes for the ISVI students.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60613 - Web Applications
Introduction to the concepts and technologies for engineering web software. At the end of this course, students will be initiated in the analysis, design, implementation, and validation of web software. Students will develop a semester-long team project for a real client with a social impact in the community. Individual assignments, quizzes, and participation are also important
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60622 - Cryptography
Concepts and principles of cryptography and data security. Topics covered include: principles of secrecy systems starting from classical ciphers such as Caesar and Vigenere; secret key encryption standards (DES, AES); public key encryption (RSA, ElGamal); information and number theory; hash functions; digital signatures; authentication; key exchange protocols and key certification; network centric protocols.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60625 - Machine Learning
This course provides broad introduction to machine learning, including the basics of learning theory, supervised learning, unsupervised learning, semi-supervised learning, and various advanced topics such as deep learning, sequential learning, active learning, relational learning, and graphical models. The course will give the student the basic ideas and intuition behind modern machine learning methods as well as a bit more formal understanding of how, why, and when they work. The course will also include discussions on some of the recent applications in big data, healthcare, personalization, environmental sciences, and networks. The course will assignments (including programming), project, and reading driven.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60641 - Graduate Operating Systems
This course introduces students to advanced topics in operating systems. The course will follow the course text book as well as important research publications. Topics include: advanced process management mechanisms, virtual machines, monolithic vs micro kernels, storage management, protection and security, OS reliability and robustness, energy aware computing and other current research topics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60647 - Data Science
Data mining uses methods from multiple fields including but not limited to: machine learning, pattern recognition, databases, probability and statistics, information theory and visualization. The focus of this course will primarily be the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from probability, statistics, pattern recognition, and information theory. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts, and also apply them to the real world data sets. It will also touch upon some of the advances in related fields such as web mining, intrusion detection, bioinformatics, etc. In addition, we will discuss the role of data mining in the society.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60655 - Technical Concepts of Visual Effects
This class seeks to introduce students to some basic concepts of computer-generated imagery as it is used in the field of visual effects, and to delve into some of the technical underpinnings of the field. While some focus will rely on artistic critique and evaluation, most of the emphasis of the class will be placed on understanding fundamental concepts of 3d modeling, texturing, lighting, rendering, and compositing. Those who excel in the visual effects industry are those who have both a strong aesthetic sense coupled with a solid understanding of what the software being used is doing "under the hood." This class, therefore, will seek to stress both aspects of the industry. From a methodology standpoint, the class will consist of lectures, several projects that will be worked on both in-class and out of class, scripting, many tutorials, and open discussion.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60657 - Natural Language Processing
Computers process massive amounts of information every day in the form of human language. Although they do not understand any of it, they can learn how to do things like answer questions about it, or translate it into other languages. This course is a systematic introduction to the ideas that form the foundation of current language technologies and research into future language technologies.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60732 - C/C++ Programming
Top-down analysis and structured programming. Basic analysis of algorithms, algorithm development, implementation and debugging and testing of programs will also be emphasized. Students will write several programs in the C++ language to learn the concepts taught and to acquire experience in solving problems using the UNIX operating system.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60746 - Advanced Database Projects
Advanced topics in database concepts; the course's main goal is a major final project, where groups will compete for prizes and awards.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60755 - Parallel Computing
This course provides the student with a comprehensive introduction to the the field of parallel computing. From the implicit instruction and data parallelism that is ubiquitous in modern processor designs through to the concurrency inherent in many fundamental numerical and non-numerical algorithms, achieving maximum application performance is only achievable with a thorough understanding of parallel computing architectures, parallel algorithms and their implementation in modern parallel programming languages. After a review of modern high-performance computing systems, students will undertake a tour-de-force of parallel programming models and languages including shared-memory programming with Pthreads, OpenMP and Intel Cilk++, distributed memory programming with MPI and UPC, next-generation parallel programming with Cray Chapel and finally co-processor acceleration using CUDA and/or OpenACC. To complement their parallel programming skills, students will learn the important concepts behind debugging parallel codes as well as profiling and tuning parallel codes to maximize performance. To complete the course students will undertake a survey of important numerical and non-numerical parallel algorithms including their implementation in community-standard libraries e.g. ScaLAPACK, PETSc. Practical exercises that complement the lecture material will be completed on high-performance computing clusters provided by the Center For Research Computing (CRC) as well as national supercomputing resources made available through XSEDE.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60814 - Mobile Computing
This course looks at the intersection between mobile computing, mobile telephony, and wireless networking, addressing the unique network protocol challenges and opportunities presented in these fields. While some of the more important physical layer properties of radio communications will be touched, the focus will be on network protocols above the physical layer, particularly media access control, transport protocols, and routing. The course will be project-oriented, giving students an opportunity to work with state-of-the-art mobile computing technology, including cell phone programming, location-aware systems using GPS, and emerging network protocols and applications.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60817 - Healthcare Analytics: A Data-Driven Approach
Healthcare is facing a digital revolution from data collection to its application decision making. The Affordable Care Act has a major provision for electronic health records or EHR (first regulation will be effective Oct 1, 2012). The EHR will not only reduce the paperwork and administrative effort, but it will also lead to a reduction in costs, reduction in errors, improved and standardized data, and the meaningful use of such data will improve the quality of care (preventative medicine). With the availability of the digitized data comes the opportunity of novel large scale analytics towards prospective healthcare --- a personalized assessment of ones's health, along with a sundry of recommended lifestyle changes. Meaningful use of the electronic health care data is to not only take a giant leap towards personalized and prospective health care, but also reduce the healthcare costs by designing a better disease management strategy, leading to lifestyle adjustments and pre-emptive measures. Personalized medicine integrates genetic, genomic, and clinical information to predict a person's likelihood of developing a disease, its onset course, and potential treatment plans. The course will bring together the intersection of medicine and computational thinking for the grand challenge problems in healthcare. It will focus on aspects of information technology or informatics in EHR (design and development, current practices, standards and terminology), integration with genetic/genomic data, relevant concepts of data mining and analytics (including visualization) for evidence based medicine, prospective healthcare and personalized medicine, social networks for health, and privacy and ethics. The course will also feature talks from leaders in healthcare sector. The course will have a strong focus on case studies and project. The students will have the opportunities to work on real data-driven problems for healthcare
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60822 - Cloud Computing
This course introduces fundamentals and applications of cloud computing intended primarily for computer science and computer engineering majors. Core concepts of virtualization, cloud infrastructure components, and cloud services will be covered. Specific areas of discussion include virtual machine performance, cloud management interfaces, network and storage infrastructure, IaaS, PaaS, SaaS, QoS, Cloud Security, and hybrid cloud models. Students will have the opportunity to apply their understanding of cloud infrastructure in practice through course projects with access to both campus and commercial cloud services.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60838 - Data Visualization
Introduction to data visualization with a particular emphasis on the interactive visualization of abstract data sources. You will study how to use visual representations and interaction techniques to help people analyze, understand, and communicate complex data. You will learn how to choose appropriate representations and how to design novel representations as well as how to build and evaluate your designs. Topics include design and evaluation methodology, visualization programming using D3.js, visualization design principles and guidelines, idiomatic representations for various types of data including parallel coordinates plots, radar charts, graph and tree representations (node-link, matrix, treemap), time-series, geospatial, and text representations. Students will have the opportunity to learn, implement, and apply visualization techniques through review of state-of-the-art literature, homework assignments, and a class project.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60849 - Video Game Design
This course introduces students to the design and implementation of video games. Video games are one of the most popular types of software, bringing together many disciplines such as gameplay design, storytelling, real-time graphics, physics modeling, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. Video games are used not only in the entertainment industry, but also in education, training, rehabilitation, and social networking, among other areas. Through a mix of lectures, case studies, and projects, students will get practical experience on game-play design and video-game construction in an object-oriented language.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60855 - Massively Parallel Computing
This course will address the growth in importance of "thinking parallel" and doing so in massive fashion (multi-million to billion-way concurrency). It will have three major parts. First is a discussion of computing architecture: what is the spectrum of modern parallel systems at the hardware and system interconnect level. Second is programming languages, runtimes, and execution models that allow the parallelism available in the hardware to be used in real programs. Third are parallel algorithms - what do algorithms look like that can actually be expressed in the referenced languages and systems in ways that use the underlying hardware. Students will be expected to prepare reviews for class presentation of novel or historically important systems. They also will be expected to learn some modern parallel programming language enough to prepare some simple benchmarks and then run and analyze them on systems of different sizes.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60868 - Neural Networks
Neural networks are computer models inspired by our understanding of how human brain learns and processes an acquired information. This introductory course will guide you through different neural architectures suitable for various applications. We will start with bio-inspired modeling of neurons (inputs, activation function) and discuss how to use them to build artificial networks (connections, layers). The course will present structures used in supervised learning, that is static networks (Rosenblatt perceptron, Adaline, multi-layer perceptron, radial networks, deep networks including recently popular convolutional nets) and dynamic networks (recurrent networks, associative memory, Hopfield's and Boltzman's machines). Next the networks used in unsupervised learning will be discussed, such as self-organizing maps, Kohonen's networks and structures based on adaptive resonance theory (ART). The course will show how to efficiently apply different types of artificial neural networks in approximation and classification tasks and dynamic systems. We will discuss appropriate learning strategies for each of these applications and their details, such as gradient estimation and minimization techniques. Semester projects will be focused on solving real classification tasks related to computer vision area and with the use of up-to-date neural network software.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60884 - Network Science
Networks are everywhere! Networks (graphs) can be used to elegantly model and analyze real-world phenomena in various domains. Examples are the Internet, Facebook, cell phone communications, airline routes, stock markets, disease spread, brain, molecular interactions between genes/proteins in a cell etc. Networks are important! For example, both graphite and diamond are composed of carbon atoms, but what gives them different properties (graphite being soft and dark, diamond being hard and clear) is the connections (links) between the atoms, i.e., the network. So, what is network science about? This interdisciplinary course will introduce students to the different types of real-world networks. Also, the course will introduce state-of-the-art computational approaches for network analysis. Because of the increasing complexity of the real-world network data, in order to analyze the networks efficiently, these approaches will span many fields, e.g., algorithms, graph theory, data mining, machine learning, pattern recognition, information theory, big data, probability and statistics, and visualization. Vibrant network science topics that will be explored include: network properties and measures of network structure, network modeling, network evolution (i.e., dynamic network analysis), link prediction, community detection (i.e., clustering), network comparison and alignment, network integration (i.e., heterogeneous network analysis), and network visualization. While the course will encompass traditional course activities (lectures, homeworks, and exams), the focus will be on getting practical hands-on experience in analyzing real-world network data through a course project, reading latest research papers on network science and its real-life applications in a variety of domains, and active in-class discussion of the papers
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60913 - Design/Analysis of Algorithms
Techniques for designing efficient computer algorithms and for analyzing computational costs of algorithms. Common design strategies such as dynamic programming, divide-and-conquer, and Greedy methods. Problem-solving approaches such as sorting, searching, and selection; lower bounds; data structures; algorithms for graph problems; geometric problems; and other selected problems. Computationally intractable problems (NP-completeness).
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60923 - Case Studies in Computing-Based Entrepreneurship
The purpose of this course is to Inform, Introduce and (hopefully) Inspire you. You will become Informed about computing-based entrepreneurship case studies across a wide variety of areas: computer software, computer hardware, healthcare technologies, databases, web services, data analytics and more. You will also become Informed about different aspects of the entrepreneurship challenge. You will be Introduced to guest speakers who are, or who have been, principals in developing technology, founding companies, running companies, selecting technologies for venture capital investment, etc. As a result, you will hopefully be Inspired to consider pursuing computing-based entrepreneurship opportunity.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60924 - Building a High-Tech Startup
This course will cover formulation of the "idea" for the startup, attributes of successful tech startups, understanding the market, structuring the company, building a team and organization, financial indicators, launching, early marketing and growth, and business plan structure.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60943 - Autonomous Mobile Robots
This course introduces the fundamental computational problems of autonomous mobile robots, including locomotion, sensing, perception, control, mapping, and planning. We will also explore current research topics in the field, such as social robotics, healthcare robotics, and driverless cars. Because robotics is an inherently physical science, this course is entirely group project-based, and students will practice concepts learned in class on Turtlebot robots during weekly programming assignments. The class also has a final capstone project that includes an exhibition at the Annual Notre Dame National Robotics Week Event (ND-NRW) in April, a community science outreach event.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZCSC-Commnty Engagmnt Course, ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60952 - Introduction to Network Science
Network science is a new and emerging scientific discipline examining diverse complex systems. This course will cover a number of interdisciplinary topics in the study of real-world networks. Examples include: Internet, power grids (technological networks); information networks such as the world-wide-web; social networks; and biological networks (biochemical, neural, ecological). The fundamentals of network theory will be explored, including graph theory; measures and metrics, and the large-scale structure of networks. Computer algorithms for efficient analysis of network data will be discussed. Network models to be discussed include random graphs, random graphs with general degree distributions, and network growth and evolution models. Processes on networks to be discussed include percolation on networks, epidemics, network search, dynamical systems on networks, and synchronization. This course is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, requiring only basic mathematical knowledge of linear algebra and calculus. Students will have the opportunity to further expand their programming skills by implementing the computational algorithms studied or developing scientific programming experience if lacking basic programming background.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60964 - Human Factors of Computer Systems
The following aspects human factors of computer systems are going to be covered: eye-gaze human computer interaction, usability evaluation via human visual system behavior, gaze-contingent displays, eye movement detection and processing, Kalman filters. Eye-gaze based interface design. Interdisciplinary applications of eye tracking to the areas of Biometrics, Physical Therapy, Geographic Informational Sciences and Psychology will be discussed. Anatomical and physiological aspects of human vision will be considered. Some aspects of the Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI) are going to be discussed. The students are going to be evaluated based on tests, programming projects and oral presentations of research papers. This class will provide you with the skill of creating/evaluating novel and existing human computer interfaces. By considering an eye tracker as a novel input tool you will be able to understand advantages/challenges when new technology emerges. You will be able to put these skills and your project on your resume when applying to such companies as Apple and Microsoft, which are interested in this technology as one of the directions of the future of interface design.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 60974 - Gateways for Big Data
Advanced technologies and experimental methods lead to an unprecedented demand for large-scale data management and analysis. This course provides the student with an comprehensive introduction to concepts and implementations of gateways for Big Data. In general, a gateway provides a single point of entry to a set of computational tools and data of a specific application domain while hiding the complex underlying infrastructure from the user. The overall goal of gateways is to increase the usability of applications and to offer intuitive user interfaces tailored to the communities' needs. Developers of such gateways have to tackle diverse aspects: from security through tool and workflow provisioning to distributed data management capabilities. Mature frameworks, libraries and portals (e.g., the Galaxy web-based platform) have been evolving to aid developers addressing challenges in these fields. The course focuses on the diverse aspects and concepts of gateways especially in the context of Big Data in bioinformatics. Besides the theoretical foundation, students will have practical exercises to apply distributed computing infrastructures and to integrate applications, workflows and data into a gateway.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 63801 - Research Seminar I
Weekly seminars for graduate students.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 63802 - Research Seminar II
Weekly seminars for graduate students.
1.000 Credit hours
1.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 64648 - Data Science (online)
Data science can be viewed as the art and craft of extracting knowledge from large bodies of structured and unstructured data using methods from many disciplines, including (but not limited to) machine learning, databases, probability and statistics, information theory, and data visualization. This course will focus on the process of data science -- from data acquisition to analytics methods to deployment, and will walk the students through both the technical and use-case aspects in the process. It will place a larger emphasis on the machine learning component, with relevant inclusions and references from other disciplines. The course will give students an opportunity to implement and experiment with some of the concepts as part of a class project, in addition to the hands-on assignments using the Python programming language. Additionally, the course touches upon some of the advances in related topics such as big data and discuss the role of data mining in contemporary society. The course has been designed and developed by Nitesh Chawla, the Frank Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of iCeNSA at the University of Notre Dame.

Note: this course is delivered fully online. The course design combines required live weekly meetings online with self-scheduled lectures, problems, assignments, and interactive learning materials. To participate, students will need to have a computer with webcam, reliable internet connection, and a quiet place to participate in live sessions.

Students enrolling in this course should have taken one or more courses or implemented one or more projects involving Python programming and one or more courses in probability or statistics.
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZOOL-OnlineLearning (inactive)

CSE 66320 - Directed Readings-Databases
A directed readings course for Databases under the supervision of Ramzi Bualuan.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 66557 - Directed Readings-Expressive Robotics
Research related to expressive robotics.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 66560 - Directed Readings-Advanced Bioinformatics Computing
Advanced topics in bioinformatics: substitution models for sequence alignment, synonymous vs. nonsynonomous changes, fast-approximation algorithms. String data structures and algorithms including suffix trees, suffix arrays and the Burrows-Wheeler transform. Molecular phylogeny including supertrees and other formal analysis. Advanced genomics applications such as multiple genome alignment, DeBruijn graphs, and microarray analysis with a focus on biclustering and genotype-phenotype associations. This class will rely heavily on primary literature with a focus on algorithmic analysis.
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 66561 - Directed Readings
Directed readings course consisting of reading and generating research papers that will culminate in a manuscript with advisor.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 66725 - Directed Readings in Machine Learning and Computer Vision
Analysis of the fundamental and recent algorithms and conceptual advances in machine learning and their application in solving problems in computer vision
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 66771 - Directed Readings - Distributed Systems
This course will explore the foundations of distributed computing through a series of of classic papers selected from the research literature. Topics include time, synchronization, consensus, consistency, fault tolerance, and security.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate, Undergraduate Non-Degree
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 67732 - C/C++ Programming
Top-down analysis and structured programming. Basic analysis of algorithms, algorithm development, implementation and debugging and testing of programs will also be emphasized. Students will write several programs in the C++ language to learn the concepts taught and to acquire experience in solving problems using the UNIX operating system.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 67890 - Independent Summer Research
This course is for graduate students receiving a summer stipend and conducting independent research. Registering for this course will ensure proper classification for tax purposes. Only those students both actively engaged in research and receiving a stipend are eligible for this course.
0.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 67900 - Special Studies
This number is reserved for specialized and/or experimental graduate courses. Content, credit, and instructor will be announced by department. (Offered if necessary)
0.000 TO 12.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 12.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 67935 - Cybersecurity Case Studies
The availability of mission-critical web sites, computer systems, and associated infrastructure components is a major requirement for the viability of an organization. A cyber-attack or disaster could negate the capability of an organization to provide uninterrupted computer system availability and service to its customers, suppliers and vendors. This includes computer systems that control critical US infrastructure (i.e., transportation, power, energy systems). This course provides an analysis of the requirements for business continuity and disaster recovery planning related to mission critical computer systems. Students will learn how to identify vulnerabilities and implement countermeasures to reduce/mitigate risk. Techniques will be taught for creating a continuity plan and the methodology for building an infrastructure that supports its effective implementation. Skills will be acquired through a series of interactive case studies and workshops. Students will work in groups and design and develop a disaster recovery plan. Workshops include: performing a threat and impact analysis, selecting disaster recovery sites and technology, planning the disaster recovery project, developing strategies for systems and telecommunications recovery, organizing a team structure for use in an emergency and developing a disaster recovery plan according to industry standards and best practices. At the end of the course students should be able to: - Describe various types of cyber-attacks and disasters that could effect computer systems and their associated risks. - Understand how to conduct a risk assessment and the countermeasures that should be implemented to reduce/mitigate risk. - Apply lessons learned from real-world situations to present-day business continuity planning and disaster recovery scenarios. - Understand the methodologies used in developing business continuity and disaster recovery plans. - Be aware of organizational, procedural, and technical requirements for maintaining continuity of computer operations. - Develop a comprehensive business continuity/disaster recovery plan according to industry standards and best practices.
3.000 Credit hours
3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

Course Attributes:
ZTST - Final exam

CSE 68900 - Thesis Direction
Research to satisfy the six credit hours required for the master's degree.
0.000 TO 12.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 12.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 68901 - Thesis Direction
Research to satisfy the six credit hours required for the master's degree.
0.000 TO 9.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 9.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 68905 - Nonresident Dissertation Research
Required of nonresident master's degree students who are completing their theses in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.
1.000 TO 9.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 9.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 77900 - Special Studies
This number is reserved for specialized and/or experimental graduate courses. Content, credit, and instructor will be announced by department. (Offered if necessary)
0.000 TO 12.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 12.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 87001 - Computing Research Experiences for Teachers
Non-degree graduate credit for middle and high school teachers participating in summer research program with Notre Dame faculty.
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 87101 - Bowman Creek Educational Ecosystem Research Experience for Teachers
Non-degree graduate credit for middle and high school teachers participating in summer research with Notre Dame faculty related to the Bowman Creek Educational Ecosystem (BCe2).
3.000 Credit hours
0.000 Lecture hours
3.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate Business Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, Parish Programs, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 98900 - Research and Dissertation
Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.
0.000 TO 12.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 12.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 98901 - Research and Dissertation
Research and dissertation for resident doctoral students.
0.000 TO 9.000 Credit hours
0.000 TO 9.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department

CSE 98995 - Nonresident Dissertation Research
Required of nonresident doctoral students who are completing their dissertations in absentia and who wish to retain their degree status.
1.000 TO 3.000 Credit hours
1.000 TO 3.000 Lecture hours
0.000 Lab hours

Levels: Undeclared, All levels at the University:, Employee Non-Degree, Graduate Architecture, Graduate Business, Graduate Non-Degree, Graduate, Holy Cross College, Law Doctorate, Law Non-Degree, Law, Pre-College, St. Mary's College, Undergraduate Non-Degree, Undergraduate
Schedule Types: Class

Graduate School Division
Computer Science and Engr. Department


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